Read Like A Writer

There are two ways to learn how to write fiction: by reading it and by writing it. Yes, you can learn lots about writing stories in workshops, in writing classes and writing groups, at writers' conferences. You can learn technique and process by reading the dozens of books like this one on fiction writing and by reading articles in writers' magazines. But the best teachers of fiction are the great works of fiction themselves. You can learn more about the structure of a short story by reading Anton Chekhov's 'Heartache' than you can in a semester of Creative Writing 101. If you read like a writer, that is, which means you have to read everything twice, at least. When you read a story or novel the first time, just let it happen. Enjoy the journey. When you've finished, you know where the story took you, and now you can go back and reread, and this time notice how the writer reached that destination. Notice the choices he made at each chapter, each sentence, each word. (Every word is a choice.) You see now how the transitions work, how a character gets across a room. All this time you're learning. You loved the central character in the story, and now you can see how the writer presented the character and rendered her worthy of your love and attention. The first reading is creative—you collaborate with the writer in making the story. The second reading is critical.


John Dufresne, from his book, The Lie That Tells A Truth: A Guide to Writing Fiction

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Thursday, October 6, 2016

The Best of the World's Classics, Restricted to prose. (I - X) Complete


THE BEST

of the

World's Classics

RESTRICTED TO PROSE


HENRY CABOT LODGE

Editor-in-Chief

FRANCIS W. HALSEY

Associate Editor


With an Introduction, Biographical and
Explanatory Notes, etc.


IN TEN VOLUMES


Vol. I - X




FUNK & WAGNALLS COMPANY

NEW YORK AND LONDON




Copyright, 1909, by

FUNK & WAGNALLS COMPANY


  1. The Best of the World's Classics, Restricted to prose. Volume I (of X) - Greece
  2. The Best of the World's Classics, Restricted to prose. Volume II (of X) - Rome
  3. The Best of the World's Classics, Restricted to prose. Volume III (of X) - Great Britain and Ireland I
  4. The Best of the World's Classics, Restricted to Prose, Vol. IV (of X) - Great Britain and Ireland II
  5. The Best of the World's Classics, Restricted to Prose, Vol. V (of X) - Great Britain and Ireland III
  6. The Best of the World's Classics, Restricted to Prose, Vol. VI (of X)--Great Britain and Ireland IV
  7. The Best of the World's Classics, Restricted to Prose, Vol. VII (of X)--Continental Europe I
  8. The Best of the World's Classics, Restricted to Prose, Vol. VIII (of X) - Continental Europe II
  9. The Best of the World's Classics, Restricted to Prose, Vol. IX (of X) - America - I
  10. The Best of the World's Classics, Restricted to Prose, Vol. X (of X) - America - II

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